Tag Archives: Poetry

Translation: Question of Lust

3 Nov

I’m happy to share that another one of my translations of Oriette D’Angelo’s poems from her book “Cardiopatías” has been published!

The poem “Question of Lust” is now live on the Columbia Journal Online.

Screenshot of Oriette D'Angelo's poem on the Columbia Journal website

To read the poem, click on the image.

 

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2019 Betty Gabehart Prize for Poetry!

25 Jul

I have amazing news – I won the 2019 Betty Gabehart Prize for Poetry! I will  be reading my poems onstage with Dr. DaMaris Hill, author of “A Bound Woman is a Dangerous Thing.

From the Kentucky Women Writers Conference website:

“Every year the Kentucky Women Writers Conference offers three emerging writer awards in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Each winner receives full tuition support for the September conference, enrollment in a workshop, a $300 honorarium, and the opportunity to read her winning manuscript onstage during the conference. The Betty Gabehart Prize honors our good friend, patron, and former director who led the conference during its seminal decade in the 1980s.  2019 WINNERS ANNOUNCED! (please click on this link)”

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Heart Diseases on Asymptote!

23 Apr Meme-type graphic depicting a woman in distress with the overlay of text "Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead." From "Heart Diseases" by Oriette D'Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker. This image is property of Asymptote Journal.

 

The past year, in addition to working on my own poetry, I embarked on a project translating the work of Venezuelan poet Oriette D’Angelo, who has been exiled from her native country since 2015. D’Angelo’s first book of poetry, Cardiopatías, won an award in Venezuela that same year.

Five of the poems from her award-winning book appear in the Spring 2019 issue of Asymptote, translated by me! To see how the world is embracing Oriette’s work brings me a ton of joy. Please jump over to Asymptote’s website and check them out, and if you like them, please jump back and let me know!!

Meme-type graphic depicting a woman in distress with the overlay of text "Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead." From "Heart Diseases" by Oriette D'Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker. This image is property of Asymptote Journal.

“Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead.” From “Heart Diseases” by Oriette D’Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker.

Guest Poet: Isabel Alvear

21 Apr

The Park Awakens

Inside the park, dirt churning
The sandy soil moistly warming
The earth readying, fortifying
Nurturing, gathering power
Pushing up daffodils and lilies

Deep inhale, the smells of spring
Heat gathering as nature’s strength
Returns to give life, permeates
All through Jackie Robinson park
The dogs following her vigor
Gather scents feverishly, salivating
Zig-zagging, nuzzling the earth

Oft times like forensic scientists
Dogs are like the original CSI’s
Of the human domestic experience
Lifting one paw whilst noses buried
Smelling all creatures’ messages
Like the tulip bulbs splitting open
Like the worms actively moving seeds

Pollen floating through sun-rays
The park cheerful with mating birds
Budding branches gently quivering
Under the weight of their vibrating
Chests, and nature yawns, stretching
Awake under winter’s uneasy slumber
Spring’s dominance now commencing

©April 2019, Isabel Alvear

Spring is coming on strong, and this poem illustrates that heady sensation exquisitely!

Asymptote’s Translation Tuesday: Forbidden to Pass By and Stay

19 Mar

Excited to share that my translation of Oriette D’Angelo’s poem, “Forbidden to Pass By and Stay” is featured on Asymptote’s Translation Tuesday today. Here is a link to you can check it out: Forbidden to Pass By and Stay by Oriette D’Angelo

Reading at The Betsy March 7th!

2 Mar

For the past three weeks I’ve been participating in a generative poetry workshop through O, Miami with wonderful poet and human, Mahogany Browne (#blackgirlmagic). The workshop’s focus is “Nature and the Socio-Political Body” and the work being produced by the poets has been outstanding.

If you have an opportunity to workshop with Mahogany Browne— DO IT. It was excellent in so many ways. First of all, she conducts her workshop very professionally, and is an excellent manager of time. She kept us on track and each session included time for two generative prompts, close reading of poems by contemporary poets, and workshop time for feedback on our new poems. Secondly, the themes and topics that she chose to help springboard our poems resonated deeply with us. These were not fluffy and safe topics, but they were well presented and designed to help us draw from the profundities of our own well.

This Thursday, March 7th our workshop is having a finale reading at The Betsy in Miami Beach. I’ll be reading new work!

Here’s a link to the official info from O, Miami: http://www.omiami.org/events/2019/3/7/mahogany-l-browne-community-reading

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This is me, reading at the Bread Loaf Environmental Writers Conference in June 2018.

Ode to Guayaquil

16 Aug

I am overjoyed to share that my poem in Spanish, “Ode to Guayaquil,” appears in the August 2018 edition of The Acentos Review! There is a great line up of poets in this issue that I am grateful to be counted among – including Alexandra Gulden, Monica Garcia, and ire’ne lara silva!

You can read the entire issue here: The Acentos Review

And I have a new bio pic!

lupita eyde tucker bio photo

Rules of Engagement

11 Feb

Thanks to the Baltimore Review for publishing my poem, Rules of Engagement in their Winter 2018 online issue! It will also appear in print in their annual magazine. I hope you take a minute to visit their site and read it! I am overjoyed that it has found a home.

In October 2016 I heard Claudia Rankine read from her book Citizen at the Dodge Poetry Festival in Newark, NJ. This poem is the offspring of that experience—her work put me in touch with the feeling of helpless rage that I had long ago buried. I had to bring these experiences out of the silence of forget, and give myself the voice I was never allowed to have.

Reading Rules of Engagement at the Asbury Hotel

That’s me reading my fresh poem in my blue motorcycle jacket at the Hear Me Roar Open Mic at the Asbury Hotel, Asbury Park, NJ. October 23, 2016.

The night I wrote the poem, the last night of the 2016 Dodge Poetry Festival, I went to the Asbury Hotel in Asbury Park to write. There just *happened* to be an open mike night there that night. I was writing furiously in my notebook my thoughts from the weekend, and the poem literally wrote itself into my notebook as a journal entry.

When I realized that people were getting up and reading poems – I looked at what I wrote and thought maybe I could put it into verses and do a sort of spoken word poem— i’d never done that before, but it had an undeniable rythym to it…

It took a lot of guts to ask the emcee for permission to read it, and then actually get up in a room full of strangers and read it. The beautiful Susan Rosenberg came over while I was there, and witnessed this whole thing happen. And she took a photo of me reading the very, very rough first draft of this poem. It was a huge turning point for me. I’d never written or even talked about this stuff ever before, let alone write a poem on the spot and read it to a room full of strangers.

 

Año Viejo

1 Dec

My poem, Año Viejo, was published in the Fall 2017 issue of the Naugatuck River Review.

 

Año Viejo

Año Viejo was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

O, Miami Chapbook Workshop 2017

31 Oct

Spread over 8 weeks in the months of Sept. and Oct., the O, Miami “Write and Publish Your Own Chapbook” workshop explored the chapbook in all it’s forms, gave participants a chance to generate poetry with thoughtful prompts and readings, and time together to workshop poems in preparation for publication.

Literally, the moment I found out about the O, Miami Chapbook Workshop, I signed up. I have been thinking about publishing a chapbook for a long time now. I have several groups of poems that I have already written, and ideas for poems that I could write, to potentially include in several different chapbooks. This workshop helped me dedicate time and commit to making one chapbook a reality. That in itself was priceless.

Our instructor, Caroline Cabrera, did an outstanding job of leading us down a path to learning and understanding what our chapbooks could be- one major facet of our workshop was that by the end of the 8 weeks we were going to have a 12-page chapbook, printed and bound, all of our very own.

The workshop gave us the opportunity to not just generate new work, but also workshop our poems with the other poets in the group. We each workshopped three poems, one every other week. Discussions were lead by Caroline, who was an excellent moderator and helped guide us as we discussed each poem. Thankfully, we really gelled as a group and learned a lot from each other. All of this unleashed a wave of creativity and inspiration that I think we all felt – every night after class I got back home and wanted to write and read poetry all night long, my brain firing in all kinds of creative directions.

Another excellent aspect of the workshop was the ability to focus on one idea or theme in our poetry, and begin to carry that through to a finished product. Beginning with the first week of the workshop, Caroline brought her personal collection of chapbooks to share with us by lending them out. Seeing how different poets approach this medium is fascinating and liberating. A chapbook is a world unto itself- a journey into the mind of each poet. I wish I had more time to read more of them 🙂 But my takeaway was that I could envision my chapbook as it’s own little world, and that has translated into a laser-like focus that I am still learning from.

There truly is nothing like holding a book of your own words in your hands. Our finished products were designed by Phil, Caroline’s husband, who took great care and creativity in laying out the covers and pages. It’s one thing to run copies of your own poetry off of your printer, but it’s a totally different experience to see them laid out, looking book-professional and official. Thank you, Phil!

We each produced 10 copies of our finished product. Since our chapbooks are part of a series for our class, we decided to call it the Category Six Chapbook Series (thanks to Hurricane Irma which hit during the second week of class). They are similar in cover design, but we were encouraged to embellish them in any way we want to. From seeing Caroline’s collection of chapbooks, I knew that I wanted a little color and some more tactile elements, so I included some end papers and a ribbon bookmark in mine. In several of my poems I use the phrase green-gold, so my end papers are gold vellum, and my ribbon bookmark is thin green satin. I think they look beautiful!

All of the participants also received the PDF file of their chapbook so they can print up more copies if they wanted to. Some of the poets in the workshop are selling their chapbooks. I gave away 8 copies of my chapbook and kept 2 for my family. I am not going to print any additional copies, mainly because I already have worked some more on those poems and am submitting them to literary magazines and poetry contests.

This workshop was one of the best experiences in my entire life. It jump-started my chapbook, which eventually is going to grow into a book-length collection of poems. I now have a manuscript that I am going to work on over the summer at the Bread Loaf Environmental Writer’s Conference in Ripton, Vermont. My goal is not only to expand the collection, but also to use that manuscript to apply to MFA programs for Fall 2019.

Thank you O, Miami!!!

plein air ecstatic poetry

Creek Lover – my 12 page chapbook of plein air ecstatic poetry.

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