Tag Archives: Poetry

Pushcart Prize Nomination for “Knee on Dirt”

8 Feb

It’s very encouraging to be nominated for a Pushcart, but it’s a double blessing when it’s a nomination of a translation. I got word on Saturday that The Arkansas International nominated my translation of “Knee on Dirt” by Oriette D’Angelo for a Pushcart Prize. I didn’t even know that translations could be nominated, so this was a wonderful surprise for me.

My passion for translating comes from the desire to bring more exposure to important poetic voices from South America. Oriette D’Angelo is one of those essential, important voices! This Pushcart nomination provides the opportunity to shed more light on Oriette D’Angelo’s work, and for that I am incredibly grateful.

The poem “Knee on Dirt” comes from Oriette’s collection “Cardiopatías,” which I’ve translated and am in the process of finding a publisher. It derives it’s title from the directive in Spanish, “Rodilla en Tierra” which is what Chavez coerced the Venezuelans to do to show subjugation to his regime, equating submission with patriotism. Bringing the poem across from Spanish into English adds other timely dimensions to the speaker’s words and symbols.

Here’s a link to “Knee on Dirt” from The Arkansas International’s website: https://www.arkint.org/oriette-dangelo

Thank you, Arkansas International, for giving this poem a place to live, and for this meaningful honor. I’m delighted and eternally grateful.

Finalist x 3: Sewanee, Georgia Review, Naugatuck Review

11 Nov

It’s been a busy couple of months! In September and October I had some super encouraging news. First, my poem “Guaranda” was chosen as a finalist for Georgia Review’s Loraine Williams Prize. Here is Judge Ilya Kaminsky’s citation:

GUARANDA by Lupita Eyde-Tucker, “This poem gives a generous sense of history, of belonging, of crossing across boundaries of both time and place, with a sack cloth and ashes omein and omein, counting Sabbaths.”


Although “Guaranda” was not published by Georgia Review, it was chosen to be published in [PANK]s Jewish Diaspora Folio, so you can read that poem online here: https://pankmagazine.com/piece/guaranda/

A few weeks later I got another encouraging email, this time from the wonderful editors at Sewanee Review. One of my poems was a finalist in their 2020 Poetry Contest! I love Sewanee Review, and they were so kind with their feedback. Even though none of the finalists’ work was published, just knowing that they liked my poem that much means a lot to me.

Then, last week I got yet another encouraging email, this time from Naugatuck River Review. One of my poems was selected as a finalist for their annual narrative poetry contest, and will be published in the winter issue! I love the Naugatuck River Review, they published my very first poem back in 2017, so it’s wonderful to be included in their pages again!

I can’t wait to read all of the winning poems, congrats to all!

“Ode to la Conquista” Honorable Mention in Margaret Reid Poetry Contest 2019

15 Apr

I entered my poem “Ode to la Conquista” in the Tom Howard/Margaret Reid Poetry Contest by Winning Writers and it won an Honorable Mention this month.

This poem is a sonnet, and one of the poems from my chapbook manuscript “How to Ride a Train in the Andes” which is unpublished and looking for a publisher.

Judge Soma Mei Sheng Frazier had this to say about the poem:

“Ode to la Conquista by Lupita Eyde-Tucker
This ceremonious ode, with its rich imagery, shrewd metaphor and mesmerizing anaphora, lays bare the savagery of human exploit. Like Ferrero’s opera, like colonization itself, the poem gives and takes—yielding beauty “to bet a kingdom on,” then reproaching with “brine rotting on boards / shrieks of secret spoils in island forests.”

“Ode to la Conquista” first appeared in Raleigh Review’s Spring 2020 print edition.

Galeón San Francisco (1586)

Translation: Question of Lust

3 Nov

I’m happy to share that another one of my translations of Oriette D’Angelo’s poems from her book “Cardiopatías” has been published!

The poem “Question of Lust” is now live on the Columbia Journal Online.

Screenshot of Oriette D'Angelo's poem on the Columbia Journal website

To read the poem, click on the image.

 

2019 Betty Gabehart Prize for Poetry!

25 Jul

I have amazing news – I won the 2019 Betty Gabehart Prize for Poetry! I will  be reading my poems onstage with Dr. DaMaris Hill, author of “A Bound Woman is a Dangerous Thing.

From the Kentucky Women Writers Conference website:

“Every year the Kentucky Women Writers Conference offers three emerging writer awards in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Each winner receives full tuition support for the September conference, enrollment in a workshop, a $300 honorarium, and the opportunity to read her winning manuscript onstage during the conference. The Betty Gabehart Prize honors our good friend, patron, and former director who led the conference during its seminal decade in the 1980s.  2019 WINNERS ANNOUNCED! (please click on this link)”

The prize did not include publication. My winning manuscript was called “How to Ride a Train in the Andes & other poems.”

Betty_Gabehart_Twitter_Announcement.jpg

Heart Diseases on Asymptote!

23 Apr Meme-type graphic depicting a woman in distress with the overlay of text "Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead." From "Heart Diseases" by Oriette D'Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker. This image is property of Asymptote Journal.

 

The past year, in addition to working on my own poetry, I embarked on a project translating the work of Venezuelan poet Oriette D’Angelo, who has been exiled from her native country since 2015. D’Angelo’s first book of poetry, Cardiopatías, won an award in Venezuela that same year.

Five of the poems from her award-winning book appear in the Spring 2019 issue of Asymptote, translated by me! To see how the world is embracing Oriette’s work brings me a ton of joy. Please jump over to Asymptote’s website and check them out, and if you like them, please jump back and let me know!!

Meme-type graphic depicting a woman in distress with the overlay of text "Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead." From "Heart Diseases" by Oriette D'Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker. This image is property of Asymptote Journal.

“Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead.” From “Heart Diseases” by Oriette D’Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker.

Guest Poet: Isabel Alvear

21 Apr

The Park Awakens

Inside the park, dirt churning
The sandy soil moistly warming
The earth readying, fortifying
Nurturing, gathering power
Pushing up daffodils and lilies

Deep inhale, the smells of spring
Heat gathering as nature’s strength
Returns to give life, permeates
All through Jackie Robinson park
The dogs following her vigor
Gather scents feverishly, salivating
Zig-zagging, nuzzling the earth

Oft times like forensic scientists
Dogs are like the original CSI’s
Of the human domestic experience
Lifting one paw whilst noses buried
Smelling all creatures’ messages
Like the tulip bulbs splitting open
Like the worms actively moving seeds

Pollen floating through sun-rays
The park cheerful with mating birds
Budding branches gently quivering
Under the weight of their vibrating
Chests, and nature yawns, stretching
Awake under winter’s uneasy slumber
Spring’s dominance now commencing

©April 2019, Isabel Alvear

Spring is coming on strong, and this poem illustrates that heady sensation exquisitely!

Asymptote’s Translation Tuesday: Forbidden to Pass By and Stay

19 Mar

Excited to share that my translation of Oriette D’Angelo’s poem, “Forbidden to Pass By and Stay” is featured on Asymptote’s Translation Tuesday today. Here is a link to you can check it out: Forbidden to Pass By and Stay by Oriette D’Angelo

Reading at The Betsy March 7th!

2 Mar

For the past three weeks I’ve been participating in a generative poetry workshop through O, Miami with wonderful poet and human, Mahogany Browne (#blackgirlmagic). The workshop’s focus is “Nature and the Socio-Political Body” and the work being produced by the poets has been outstanding.

If you have an opportunity to workshop with Mahogany Browne— DO IT. It was excellent in so many ways. First of all, she conducts her workshop very professionally, and is an excellent manager of time. She kept us on track and each session included time for two generative prompts, close reading of poems by contemporary poets, and workshop time for feedback on our new poems. Secondly, the themes and topics that she chose to help springboard our poems resonated deeply with us. These were not fluffy and safe topics, but they were well presented and designed to help us draw from the profundities of our own well.

This Thursday, March 7th our workshop is having a finale reading at The Betsy in Miami Beach. I’ll be reading new work!

Here’s a link to the official info from O, Miami: http://www.omiami.org/events/2019/3/7/mahogany-l-browne-community-reading

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This is me, reading at the Bread Loaf Environmental Writers Conference in June 2018.

Ode to Guayaquil

16 Aug

I am overjoyed to share that my poem in Spanish, “Ode to Guayaquil,” appears in the August 2018 edition of The Acentos Review! There is a great line up of poets in this issue that I am grateful to be counted among – including Alexandra Gulden, Monica Garcia, and ire’ne lara silva!

You can read the entire issue here: The Acentos Review

And I have a new bio pic!

lupita eyde tucker bio photo

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