Tag Archives: guayaquil

Tres poemas de Lupita Eyde-Tucker

3 Jan

Three new poems of mine are up on Digo.Palabra.Txt!

I am overjoyed that my poems in Spanish are finding homes. I also learned this past week that another publication, Contrapuntos VI, will be publishing some of my poems as well.

Digo.palabra.txt

5f2180912afad2af22940259afd422d3Owen Gent

Lupita Eyde-Tucker escribe y traduce poesía en inglés y español. Estudió poesía y traducción en Bread Loaf. Es Fellow de The Watering Hole y fue seleccionada como un AWP 2018 Writer to Writer Mentee. Sus poemas han aparecido en Baltimore Review, SWWIM, Muse / A Journal, Nashville Review, Small Orange, Aquifer, The Accentos Review. y próximamente en The Florida Review. Sus poemas tambien aparecen en su sitio de internet: www.notenoughpoetry.com

~

Mientras la ostra no se abre

Esto es la historia de un exilio. La que persiste puertas adentro. En las mañanas abro la brecha: párpados de concreto, pestañas de hierro se hacen pasar por ventanas. En el aire, algo quemando, duerme. Su cabeza pesada sobre el hombro de la ciudadela con aliento de diésel, el olor de las pepas de acacia secando en la rama, algo de basura. Trepo la furgoneta, la quinta persona amontonada en un…

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Ode to Guayaquil

16 Aug

I am overjoyed to share that my poem in Spanish, “Ode to Guayaquil,” appears in the August 2018 edition of The Acentos Review! There is a great line up of poets in this issue that I am grateful to be counted among – including Alexandra Gulden, Monica Garcia, and ire’ne lara silva!

You can read the entire issue here: The Acentos Review

And I have a new bio pic!

lupita eyde tucker bio photo

Ode to Sr. Mosto

14 Apr

My Algebra teacher
is 84 now, alone in the house
he grew up in, downtown
mother and sister long gone

I’d love to sit in his parlor
listen to him talk about
how 50 years of math
brought him purpose and joy

I’d rejoice at recalling his
infamous sayings, his booming voice,
weaker now, yet still resonant
with encouraging authority

And secretly, I’d hope for a pop quiz,
to prove to him I finally did learn
how to locate life’s unknown variables
only using x and y

photos_cuarto_curso_mosto

My Algebra teacher, Sr. Mosto, with me (in the sweater) and two of my best friends in 1987.

32 years ago, my Dad informed our family that we were moving to Ecuador for two years. He had been recently hired to be the new Director General of the American School of Guayaquil. I had mixed feelings about going, and leaving my Jersey shore world, but then again, I was 12. I asked him what it was going to be like, going to a new school, with all my classes in Spanish. He said, “You are going to have Mr. Mosto as your math teacher. He is an excellent math teacher.” Honestly, at the time, those words didn’t exactly excite me 😉

He was absolutely right, though. Sr. Mosto had a very clear way of explaining math. I still remember the way he formed his numbers in chalk on the board. He had flair, he had presence, discipline, exactitude, authority, efficiency, and an absolute command of algebra. He rarely got angry, and could handle a classroom full of 50 junior high students (yes, 50) AND give them an excellent base in mathematics without ever having to raise his voice. He simply and kindly commanded respect. Although he never received any formal training in teaching, he was one of those people that were born to teach. He taught at the Colegio Americano for well over 40 years, only recently retiring in 2008.

Mr. Mosto never married, and lived with his mother until her death. Now he lives alone, and at the age of 84 has medical issues, but remains alert and lucid. He pretty much has everything taken care of as far as his physical needs go. I know this because just last week, a fellow ex-alum, Tzely Shalev, got in touch with him. As he spends most of his days alone, with a godson helping him around the house, Mr. Mosto told her that he would love to hear from his students, and maybe some could even come visit him. So, she started a Facebook group and within a day had 1,700 members. Barely a week has gone by and now the group has about 2,600 former students, just from our school alone (he also taught evenings at a few other private and public schools).

Mr. Mosto has received hundreds of messages- and best of all- visits from students! On Wednesday a group of friends from my graduating class visited him and even gave him a tablet with data service so he could see all of the messages we had posted on his Facebook group, and set him up with a Facebook account.

When I look back at the teachers I have had that truly formed my intellect and gave me time-tested tools, Mr. Mosto holds one of, if not THE highest spot.

The outpouring of love and sincere desires to help from so many of my fellow alums is absolutely beautiful. What I am most grateful for is that the opportunity to do this has happened while he is still with us, when he truly needs it the most. All of this has filled my heart with indescribable joy.

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