Translation: Question of Lust

3 Nov

I’m happy to share that another one of my translations of Oriette D’Angelo’s poems from her book “Cardiopatías” has been published!

The poem “Question of Lust” is now live on the Columbia Journal Online.

Screenshot of Oriette D'Angelo's poem on the Columbia Journal website

To read the poem, click on the image.

 

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Creek Lover – A Chapbook!

25 Oct

Cover image of Creek Lover, chapbook. Image includes two copies of the book, with a picture of a creek dock and the marsh on the cover.

This past month I published my first Chapbook! It’s called Creek Lover and it’s a collection of poems centered around the salt marsh of Pawleys Island, SC.

I began writing the first poems in this collection in 2013, then later in 2017 they started taking form as a manuscript while participating in the O, Miami Chapbook Workshop in late 2017.

Two years later, the manuscript is now a shiny chapbook, self-published, hand made, and straight from my heart to yours.

Want to order one? They are only $10 (shipping included). You can send me the funds via Paypal or Venmo. All the details, plus some poems from the book can be found here.

Here are some comments I’ve received so far:

“Thank you for offering your poems to the wider world. They are a gift. Your images are powerful reminders of the splendor of the coast, the marsh birds & live oaks. What stirring words to warm me on this chilled mid-Western autumn day!” — C. Wheeler

“What a delight!” — J. Schledorn

“Your book is beautiful.” — S. Ahrens

“I love the personification, love the eroticism, love the glimpse at nature’s many faces, and loved the repetition of green-gold across several of your poems.” — A. Sehnaoui

Sábado en Alausí / Saturday in Alausí

22 Oct

Columbia Journal Fall Contest Finalist!

I’ve always been a little wary about sending poems to contests. It seems almost impossible to win, and although the prizes can be substantial, the entry fees are not cheap.

This year I decided to try my luck and entered a number of contests. While I’ve definitely gotten my usual share of rejections, this year things have been different. I won the Betty Gabehart Prize, which was amazing. Then, I was selected as a semifinalist for the Frontier Industry Prize. While I didn’t make it to the finalist round, they told me that my poem made it to the top 4% of entries. That made me feel very good and it’s been a huge encouragement for me and my poetry.

Last week I got excellent news: my poem “Sábado en Alausí/Saturday in Alausí” was selected as a finalist in the Columbia Journal Fall Contest! I didn’t win any money, but my poem got published in the Columbia Journal Online— so stoked!

The poem is about the knock on the door that so many of my ancestors dreaded. Even after emigrating to South America from Spain, the Inquisition followed. The characters are different, but this story keeps repeating itself over and over.

This poem is in Spanish and English, which is another reason why I am so grateful that it was selected. It is a gamble to send a multilingual poem in as a contest submission. But, this poem has to appear in both languages, because it is written for the descendants. I couldn’t just send it in English. It would have been like sending half the poem.

Click here to read the poem: http://columbiajournal.org/fall-2019-contest-poetry-finalist-sabado-en-alausi-saturday-in-alausi/

Then, come back here and let me know what you think in the comments!

Self Portrait Con Naranja

9 Sep

I am elated to share that my latest poem is live on the Nashville Review!!!

This poem is dedicated to my mother, Lupe Eyde.

I am so grateful for the friends and mentors who helped me in the writing and revision process, including Maggie SmithNickole Brown and Gregory Pardlo. Seeing this poem living at Nashville Review is a dream come true for me.

Click here to read it: Self Portrait Con Naranja by Lupita Eyde-Tucker

Screenshot of "Self Portrait Con Naranja" on the Nashville Review.

2019 Betty Gabehart Prize for Poetry!

25 Jul

I have amazing news – I won the 2019 Betty Gabehart Prize for Poetry! I will  be reading my poems onstage with Dr. DaMaris Hill, author of “A Bound Woman is a Dangerous Thing.

From the Kentucky Women Writers Conference website:

“Every year the Kentucky Women Writers Conference offers three emerging writer awards in poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Each winner receives full tuition support for the September conference, enrollment in a workshop, a $300 honorarium, and the opportunity to read her winning manuscript onstage during the conference. The Betty Gabehart Prize honors our good friend, patron, and former director who led the conference during its seminal decade in the 1980s.  2019 WINNERS ANNOUNCED! (please click on this link)”

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Heart Diseases on Asymptote!

23 Apr Meme-type graphic depicting a woman in distress with the overlay of text "Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead." From "Heart Diseases" by Oriette D'Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker. This image is property of Asymptote Journal.

 

The past year, in addition to working on my own poetry, I embarked on a project translating the work of Venezuelan poet Oriette D’Angelo, who has been exiled from her native country since 2015. D’Angelo’s first book of poetry, Cardiopatías, won an award in Venezuela that same year.

Five of the poems from her award-winning book appear in the Spring 2019 issue of Asymptote, translated by me! To see how the world is embracing Oriette’s work brings me a ton of joy. Please jump over to Asymptote’s website and check them out, and if you like them, please jump back and let me know!!

Meme-type graphic depicting a woman in distress with the overlay of text "Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead." From "Heart Diseases" by Oriette D'Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker. This image is property of Asymptote Journal.

“Caracas is a woman with a chest full of bullets. I am a foreigner next to so much lead.” From “Heart Diseases” by Oriette D’Angelo, translated from the Spanish by Lupita Eyde-Tucker.

Guest Poet: Isabel Alvear

21 Apr

The Park Awakens

Inside the park, dirt churning
The sandy soil moistly warming
The earth readying, fortifying
Nurturing, gathering power
Pushing up daffodils and lilies

Deep inhale, the smells of spring
Heat gathering as nature’s strength
Returns to give life, permeates
All through Jackie Robinson park
The dogs following her vigor
Gather scents feverishly, salivating
Zig-zagging, nuzzling the earth

Oft times like forensic scientists
Dogs are like the original CSI’s
Of the human domestic experience
Lifting one paw whilst noses buried
Smelling all creatures’ messages
Like the tulip bulbs splitting open
Like the worms actively moving seeds

Pollen floating through sun-rays
The park cheerful with mating birds
Budding branches gently quivering
Under the weight of their vibrating
Chests, and nature yawns, stretching
Awake under winter’s uneasy slumber
Spring’s dominance now commencing

©April 2019, Isabel Alvear

Spring is coming on strong, and this poem illustrates that heady sensation exquisitely!

Asymptote’s Translation Tuesday: Forbidden to Pass By and Stay

19 Mar

Excited to share that my translation of Oriette D’Angelo’s poem, “Forbidden to Pass By and Stay” is featured on Asymptote’s Translation Tuesday today. Here is a link to you can check it out: Forbidden to Pass By and Stay by Oriette D’Angelo

Reading at The Betsy March 7th!

2 Mar

For the past three weeks I’ve been participating in a generative poetry workshop through O, Miami with wonderful poet and human, Mahogany Browne (#blackgirlmagic). The workshop’s focus is “Nature and the Socio-Political Body” and the work being produced by the poets has been outstanding.

If you have an opportunity to workshop with Mahogany Browne— DO IT. It was excellent in so many ways. First of all, she conducts her workshop very professionally, and is an excellent manager of time. She kept us on track and each session included time for two generative prompts, close reading of poems by contemporary poets, and workshop time for feedback on our new poems. Secondly, the themes and topics that she chose to help springboard our poems resonated deeply with us. These were not fluffy and safe topics, but they were well presented and designed to help us draw from the profundities of our own well.

This Thursday, March 7th our workshop is having a finale reading at The Betsy in Miami Beach. I’ll be reading new work!

Here’s a link to the official info from O, Miami: http://www.omiami.org/events/2019/3/7/mahogany-l-browne-community-reading

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This is me, reading at the Bread Loaf Environmental Writers Conference in June 2018.

Tres poemas de Lupita Eyde-Tucker

3 Jan

Three new poems of mine are up on Digo.Palabra.Txt!

I am overjoyed that my poems in Spanish are finding homes. I also learned this past week that another publication, Contrapuntos VI, will be publishing some of my poems as well.

Digo.palabra.txt

5f2180912afad2af22940259afd422d3Owen Gent

Lupita Eyde-Tucker escribe y traduce poesía en inglés y español. Estudió poesía y traducción en Bread Loaf. Es Fellow de The Watering Hole y fue seleccionada como un AWP 2018 Writer to Writer Mentee. Sus poemas han aparecido en Baltimore Review, SWWIM, Muse / A Journal, Nashville Review, Small Orange, Aquifer, The Accentos Review. y próximamente en The Florida Review. Sus poemas tambien aparecen en su sitio de internet: www.notenoughpoetry.com

~

Mientras la ostra no se abre

Esto es la historia de un exilio. La que persiste puertas adentro. En las mañanas abro la brecha: párpados de concreto, pestañas de hierro se hacen pasar por ventanas. En el aire, algo quemando, duerme. Su cabeza pesada sobre el hombro de la ciudadela con aliento de diésel, el olor de las pepas de acacia secando en la rama, algo de basura. Trepo la furgoneta, la quinta persona amontonada en un…

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